Lady and the Tribe by Brenda Billings Ridgley

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Lady and the Tribe by Brenda Billings Ridgley
Publisher: Whole You Media
Genre: Non-Fiction (self-help)
Rated: 4 stars
Review by Poppy

Wives, mothers and career women – we have all fallen victim to the silent epidemic that is, literally . . . letting ourselves go. Not the weight-gain, makeup-free, yoga-pants routine. Little by little, we have allowed our preferences, interests, and individuality to slip away until we no longer recognize ourselves outside of our role as wives, mothers, or professionals. Who we are has become what we do.

In the process, our friendships have become the casualty of a “busy life” and lack consistency and depth. We have a gaping hole inside us that longs to be filled. How do we reclaim who we really are and fill this empty space that seemed to appear from nowhere?

The answer lies in our Tribe. Our best friends see us more clearly than we see ourselves and are representations and extensions of our individuality. They are our companions, cheerleaders, and counselors—always in our corner. They are the branches of our tree of life that lift and support us, so we can flourish. Our Tribe is the family with whom we choose to live our life . . . with no strings attached.

Lady and the Tribe is a blueprint for building deep connections. As you read, you’ll be swept away on a journey of friendship as the author shares her own personal stories and those of other women. In the process, you’ll discover how to find, nurture, and deepen friendships and create a Tribe culture that is unique to you.

I’ve just moved to the other side of the country and left all my friends and family behind. So when I saw this book pop up for review, I grabbed it since I’d love to have a new “tribe” of women friends here where I live now.

I honestly wasn’t sure exactly what to expect from this book, but I really did enjoy it. It started out a little slowly, with quite a bit of citing of studies that showed how much women need friendship and support, etc., but stick it out because it’s worth it. The author shares about her own journey and how she came to know who was in “her” tribe and whose tribes she was part of. It was interesting to see the different descriptions of the types of people you are friends with and it all made sense as I read. It made me realize that there are, in fact, friends for a season (or a reason) and we shouldn’t feel badly if we lose touch with those. And it made me recognize the few women I’ve become such good friends with that years and distance don’t matter.

My only actual criticism of this book was that, well… I’m a “doer” and a maker of lists and very type A, and I wanted more instructions on HOW to build my tribe. LOL! I was so excited at the one time she actually made a list of questions that I could write down and answer, which I did diligently and thoroughly. And when that was done, I had my journal ready for more. And it didn’t happen. (Aside to the author: maybe a workbook would be in order for people like me?)

Those of you who live a little less rigidly than I and maybe don’t love routine and to-do lists in the same passion as I do, who prefer reading others’ experiences as an illustration of how to do something should absolutely enjoy this book. And I can whole-heartedly recommend it.

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